Title of Liberty by Minerva Teichert

Title of Liberty

This painting shows the Nephite military leader Captain Moroni rallying his men.  The Nephites were facing a civil war led by Amalickiah.  When Moroni hears that Amalickiah is conspiring to become king, he ripped his coat and wrote on it:  “In memory of our God, our religion, and freedom, and our peace, our wives, and our children—and he fastened it upon the end of a pole.  And he fastened on his headplate, and his breastplate, and his shields, and girded on his armor about his loins, . . . [and] he went forth among the people, waving the rent part of his garment in the air, that all might see the writing . . . . Behold, the people came running together with their armor girded about their loins.”1

In this painting, Moroni is framed by four soldiers whose actions echo his.  The two soldiers closest to Moroni rend their coats, and the two on the edges write their oaths on their torn garments, imitating what their commander has already done.  This is an example of the use of progression and stages to reinforce themes in Teichert’s work.   Captain Moroni waves the Title of Liberty from the center of the painting.  The flag is red, white, and blue because it is “symbolic of the emblems of Israel and therefore was an appropriate rallying point for the Nephites.”2

The setting Teichert chose for this painting also reinforces the message of the title of liberty, that the Nephites are fighting for their God and their religion.  Moroni stands “at the top of a stairway that is flanked by two images of the feathered serpent, with startling turquoise eyes.  The architecture suggests Moroni is rallying his people at a temple.”3

Further reading: “Young Women—Titles of Liberty


  1. Alma 46:12-13, 19, 21
  2. John W. Welch and Doris R. Dant, The Book of Mormon Paintings of Minerva Teichert (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1997) 116
  3. John W. Welch and Doris R. Dant, The Book of Mormon Paintings of Minerva Teichert (Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1997) 118